Daydreaming

Daydreaming is a strange thing.  In hard situations, a daydream can come as an odd comfort.  To imagine a better scene, in a better place, is painful as well as strangely peaceful.

In an imaginary scene, I can control what happens.  I can’t exactly do this in real life.  And while I am bold in my fantasies, and fearless, in real life I am anything but.  In a daydream, I say the right thing, look the right way, know what to do and do not hesitate to do it.  I wish I were like that in real life.  A daydream is predictable.  It’s like a story, written in my mind.  Real life is unpredictable.  I worry too much for my daydreams to come alive.

Because of that, though, daydreams can be discouraging.  I can be completely caught up in my perfect world, where everything is at its finest at my command; yet as soon as I snap out of it, reality kicks in and I know my life can never be so ideal.

I wonder if there is any long-term benefit from a daydreamt fantasy.  It’s not as if I’ll suddenly become beautiful, with clear skin and nonfrizzy hair, if I daydream it long enough.  Pigs won’t fly, no matter how long I envision myself riding one.

And no, sorry to break it to you, Emilino, but just because you pictured it for so long does NOT mean he is going to kiss you.  Or even hold your hand.

But really, IS there any good that comes from a daydream?  How about this — you picture yourself walking through school.  You see a girl who is sitting alone.  Great, ’cause you’re used to sitting alone as well.  You approach her, and get a conversation going.  You’ve replayed the words you’ll start it with in your head.

And suppose the next week, this really DOES happen.  Maybe not exactly as you’d planned, but because you’d daydreamed this, you knew good might come of it, and so you give it a try.  And it works.

Can that happen?  Has that happened to you?

I sure can’t think of any such personal occurrance.

But I still wonder.

Can daydreams come true?

 

Emilino

Pictures courtesy:

cosmosmagazine.com

brainbasedbusiness.com

selmainthecity.wordpress.com

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7 thoughts on “Daydreaming

  1. Em, I think you are beautiful! God thinks you are beautiful, and you are His daughter, a princess!! You are happy to just be yourself, a funny, smart, awesome person who is almost always happy!! Also, you are one of my very best friends, and I think you are a great friend!! yo always make me feel happy, and give th best hugs.
    I love you lots,
    Hema

  2. I read a study just recently that linked complex problem-solving with daydreaming. So someone might not kiss you just because you imagine it, but by daydreaming about it you might find a way to get that kiss anyway:

    ‘Psychologists at the University of Chicago took three groups of basketball players. Group One practiced foul shots each day for thirty days. Group Two was instructed to “imagine” shooting foul shots each day for thirty days. Group Three was instructed to do nothing. When tested, Group One (practicing shots) improved 24 percent. Group Three (doing nothing) had no improvement. Group Two, the group that only imagined shooting foul shots, improved 23 percent yet did not physically touch a basketball.

    Why? As far as the brain knew, both groups that practiced (real & imagined) had shot foul shots daily but Group Two never missed! Group Two, never missing, was given more emotional confidence by their brain and the brain also memorized the foul-shooting pattern as though they were on the court. In Group One, their brain experienced the hit-and-miss pattern of actual foul shooting which did not build confidence.’

    http://newhopeoutreach.wordpress.com/related-articles/recovery-from-abuse/healing-emotional-memories/real-or-imagined-the-brain-doesnt-know/

    And also: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090511180702.htm

    Cool, hey? 🙂

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